Board Policy Manual Ch6


Chapter 6: Instruction

6:10 Educational Philosophy and Objectives

The District’s educational program will seek to provide an opportunity for each student to develop to his or her maximum potential. The objectives for the educational program are to:

  1. Foster students’ self-discovery, self-awareness, and self-discipline.
  2. Develop students’ awareness of and appreciation for cultural diversity.
  3. Stimulate students’ intellectual curiosity and growth.
  4. Provide students with fundamental career concepts and skills.
  5. Help students develop sensitivity to the needs and values of others and a respect for individual and group differences.
  6. Help each student strive for excellence and instill a desire to reach the limit of his or her potential.
  7. Encourage students to become life long learners.
  8. Provide an educational climate and culture free of bias concerning the protected classifications identified in policy 7:10, Equal Educational Opportunities.

In order for the Board of Education to monitor whether the educational program is attaining these objectives and to be knowledgeable of current and future resource needs, the Superintendent shall prepare an annual report that includes:

  1. A review and evaluation of the present curriculum.
  2. A projection of curriculum and resource needs.
  3. An evaluation of, and plan to eliminate, any bias in the curriculum or instructional materials and methods concerning the classifications referred to in item 8, above.
  4. Any plan for new or revised instructional program implementation.
  5. A review of present and future facility needs.

CROSS REF: 1:30 (School District Philosophy), 3:10 (Goals and Objectives), 6:15 (School Accountability), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunities)

ADOPTED: January 19, 2010

  • 6:15 School Accountability

    According to the Illinois General Assembly, the primary purpose of schooling is the transmission of knowledge and culture through which students learn in areas necessary to their continuing development and entry into the world of work. To fulfill that purpose, the Illinois State Board of Education prepared State Goals for Learning with accompanying Illinois Learning Standards.

    The School Board gives priority in the allocation of resources, including funds, time, personnel, and facilities, to fulfilling this purpose.

    Quality Assurance

    The Board continuously monitors student achievement and the quality of the District’s work. The Superintendent shall supervise the following quality assurance components, in accordance with State law and Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) rules, and continuously keep the Board informed:

    1. Prepare each school’s annual recognition application and quality assurance appraisal, whether internal or external, to assess each school’s continuous school improvement.
    2. Continuously assess the District’s and each school’s overall performance in terms of both academic success and equity. This includes, without limitation, a thorough analysis of ISBE’s balanced accountability measure and each school’s Multiple Measure Index and corresponding Annual Measurable Objective provided by ISBE.
    1. If applicable, develop District and School Improvement Plans, present them for Board approval, and supervise their implementation.
    1. Prepare a school report card, present it at a regular Board meeting, and disseminate it as provided in State law.
    2. In accordance with Sec. 2-3.153 of the School Code, administer at least biennially a survey of learning conditions on the instructional environment within the school to, at minimum, students in grades 6 through 12 and teachers.

    LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/2-3.25, 5/2-3.25a, 5/2-3.25b, 5/2-3.25c, 5/2-3.25d, 5/2-3.25d-5, 5/2-3.25e-5, 5/2-3.25f, 5/2-3.25f-5, 5/2-3.63, 5/2-3.64a-5, 5/10-21.3a, and 5/27-1.

    23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 1, Subpart A: Recognition Requirements.

    CROSS REF.:          6:170 (Title I Programs), 6:340 (Student Testing and Assessment Program), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunities)

    ADOPTED:           February 21, 2017

6:20 School Year Calendar and Day

School Calendar

The Board of Education, upon the Superintendent’s recommendation and subject to State regulations, annually establishes the dates for opening and closing classes, teacher institutes and in-services, the length and dates of vacations, and the days designated as legal school holidays. The school calendar shall have a minimum of 185 days to ensure the required number of actual student attendance.

Commemorative Holidays

The teachers and students shall devote a portion of the school day on each commemorative holiday designated in the School Code to study and honor the commemorated person or occasion. The Board may, from time to time, designate a regular school day as a commemorative holiday.

School Day

The Board establishes the length of the school day with the recommendation of the Superintendent and subject to State law requirements. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that observances required by State law are followed during each day of school attendance.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-19, 5/10-24.46, 5/18-8.05, 5/18-12, 5/18-12.5, 5/24-2, 5/27-3, 5/27-18, 5/27-19, 5/27-20, 5/27-20.1, 5/27-20.2, and 20/1.

10 ILCS 5/11-4.1.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420(f).

Metzl v. Leininger, 850 F.Supp. 740 (N.D. Ill., 1994), aff’d by 57 F.3d 618 (7th Cir., 1995).

CROSS REF.:          2:20 (Powers and Duties of the Board of Education; Indemnification), 5:200 (Terms and Conditions of Employment and Dismissal), 5:330 (Sick Days, Vacation, Holidays, and Leaves), 6:60 (Curriculum Content), 6:70 (Teaching About Religions), 7:90 (Release During School Hours)

ADOPTED:           May 5, 2015

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6:30 Organization of Instruction

The School District has instructional levels for grades pre-kindergarten through grade 12. The Superintendent shall annually present to the Board of Education a plan for organizing instructional levels and assigning them to school facilities in order to:

  1. Support the District’s educational program,
  2. Maximize facility usage without undue overcrowding, and
  3. Provide substantially comparable instructional programs across the District.

Students, for instructional purposes, may be placed in groups within a school that do not necessarily follow grade level designations. For purposes of attendance reporting and other records, however, each student is assigned a grade-level placement.

Kindergarten

The District maintains a full-day kindergarten with an instructional program that fulfills the District’s curriculum goals and objectives and the requirements of the State law. The District also offers a half-day kindergarten for those parents/guardians who request a half-day program

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.19a, 5/10-20.37, and 5/10-22.18.
23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420.

CROSS REF.: 6:40 (Curriculum Development), 6:170 (Title I Programs), 7:30 (Student Assignment), 7:50 (School Admissions and Student Transfers To and From Non-District Schools), 7:100 (Health, Eye, and Dental Examinations; Immunizations; and Exclusion of Students)

ADOPTED: January 19, 2010

Rev. 02/10

6:40 Curriculum Development

Adoption

The Superintendent shall recommend a comprehensive curriculum that is aligned with:

  1. The District’s educational philosophy and goals,
  2. Student needs as identified by research, demographics, and student achievement and other data,
  3. The knowledge, skills, and abilities required for students to become life-long learners,
  4. The minimum requirements of State and federal law and regulations for curriculum and graduation requirements,
  5. The curriculum District-wide and articulated across all grade levels,
  6. The Illinois State Learning Standards and any District learning standards, and
  7. Any required State or federal student testing.

The Board of Education will adopt, upon recommendation of the Superintendent, a curriculum that meets the above criteria.

Experimental Educational Programs and Pilot Projects

The Superintendent may recommend experimental educational programs and/or pilot projects for Board consideration. Proposals must include goals, material needs, anticipated expenses, and an evaluation process. The Superintendent shall submit to the Board periodic progress reports for programs that exceed one year in duration and a final evaluation with recommendation upon the program’s completion.

Development

The Superintendent shall develop a curriculum review program to monitor the current curriculum and promptly suggest changes to make the curriculum more effective, to take advantage of improved teaching methods and materials, and to be responsive to social change, technological developments, student needs, and community expectations.

The Superintendent shall report to the Board as appropriate, the curriculum review program’s efforts to:

  1. Regularly evaluate the curriculum and instructional program.
  2. Ensure the curriculum continues to meet the stated adoption criteria.
  3. Include input from a cross-section of teachers, administrators, parents/guardians, and students, representing all schools, grade levels, disciplines, and specialized and alternative programs.
  4. Coordinate with the process for evaluating the instructional program and materials.

Curriculum Guides and Course Outlines

The Superintendent shall develop and provide subject area curriculum guides to appropriate staff members.

LEGAL REF.:        34 C.F.R. Part 106.

105 ILCS 5/10-20.8 and 5/10-19.

CROSS REF.:          6:60 (Curriculum Content), 6:65 (Student Social and Emotional Development), 6:70 (Teaching About Religions), 6:80 (Teaching About Controversial Issues) 6:100 (Using Animals in the Educational Program), 6:110 (Programs for Students At Risk of Academic Failure and/or Dropping Out of School and Graduation Incentives Program), 6:120 (Education of Children with Disabilities), 6:130 (Program for the Gifted), 6:140 (Education of Homeless Children), 6:145 (Migrant Students), 6:150 (Home and Hospital Instruction), 6:160 (English Learners), 6;170 (Title I Programs), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunities), 7:15 (Student and Family Privacy Rights)

ADOPTED:           October 20, 2015

6:50 School Wellness

Preamble

Urbana School District (hereto referred to as the District) is committed to the optimal development of every student. The District believes that for students to have the opportunity to achieve personal, academic, developmental, and social success, we need to create positive, safe, and health-promoting learning environments at every level, in every setting, throughout the school year.

Research shows that two components, good nutrition and physical activity before, during, and after the school day, are strongly correlated with positive student outcomes. For example, student participation in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) School Breakfast Program is associated with higher grades and standardized test scores, lower absenteeism, and better performance on cognitive tasks.     Conversely, less-than-adequate consumption of specific foods including fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, is associated with lower grades among students. In addition, students who are physically active through active transport to and from school, recess, physical activity breaks, high-quality physical education, and extracurricular activities – do better academically. This policy outlines the District’s approach to ensuring environments and opportunities for all students to practice healthy eating and physical activity behaviors throughout the school day while minimizing commercial distractions. Specifically, this policy establishes goals and procedures to ensure that:

  • Students in the District have access to healthy foods throughout the school day—both through reimbursable school meals and other foods available throughout the school campus—in accordance with Federal and state nutrition standards;
  • Students receive quality nutrition education that helps them develop lifelong healthy eating behaviors;
  • Students have opportunities to be physically active before, during, and after school;
  • Schools engage in nutrition and physical activity promotion and other activities that promote student wellness;
  • School staff are encouraged and supported to practice healthy nutrition and physical activity behaviors in and out of school;
  • The community is engaged in supporting the work of the District in creating continuity between school and other settings for students and staff to practice lifelong healthy habits; and
  • The District establishes and maintains an infrastructure for management, oversight, implementation, communication about, and monitoring of the policy and its established goals and objectives.
  • This policy shall be interpreted consistently with Section 204 of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 and the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA)
  • This policy applies to all students, staff, and schools in the District.
  1. School Wellness Committee

    Committee Role and Membership
    The District will convene a representative district wellness committee (hereto referred to as DWC) that meets at least four times per year to establish goals for and oversee school health and safety policies and programs, including development, implementation, and periodic review and update of this district-level wellness policy (heretofore referred as “wellness policy”).The DWC membership will represent all school levels (elementary and secondary schools) and include (to the extent possible), but not be limited to: parents and caregivers; students; representatives of the school nutrition program (foodservice director); physical education teachers; health education teachers; school health professionals (ex., school nurses, and mental health and social services staff; school administrators, school board members; health professionals and the general public. To the extent possible, the DWC will include representatives from each school building and reflect the diversity of the community.Each school principal, or designee, will serve as the school wellness policy coordinator, who will ensure compliance with the policy. Each school principal within the District will establish an ongoing School Wellness Committee (SWC) that convenes to review school-level issues, in coordination with the DWC.Leadership

    The Superintendent or designee(s) will convene the DWC and facilitate development of and updates to the wellness policy, and will ensure each school’s compliance with the policy.

  2. Wellness Policy Implementation, Monitoring, Accountability, and Community Engagement Implementation PlanThe District will develop and maintain a plan for implementation to manage and coordinate the execution of this wellness policy. The plan delineates roles, responsibilities, actions, and timelines specific to each school, and includes information about who will be responsible to make what change, by how much, where, and when, as well as specific goals and objectives for nutrition, physical activity, physical education, and other school-based activities that promote student wellness. Each school will use the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s School Health Index to create an action plan that fosters implementation, and generate an annual progress report.The wellness plan and the progress reports can be found at: www.usd116.org.

    Annual Progress Reports

    The District will present a report to the Board of Education annually to report on the progress of each school within the district in meeting wellness goals.

    Revisions and Updating the Policy

    The DWC will update or modify the wellness policy based on the results of the annual progress reports and triennial assessments, and/or as District priorities change; community needs change; wellness goals are met; new health science, information, and technology emerges; and new Federal or state guidance or standards are issued. The wellness policy will be assessed and updated as indicated at least every three years, following the triennial assessment.

  3. Nutrition School MealsStudents will be offered and schools will promote nutritious food and beverage choices consistent with the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans published jointly by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Agriculture.  In addition, in order to promote student health and reduce childhood obesity, the Superintendent or designee shall restrict the sale of competitive foods as defined by the USDA in the food service areas during meal periods and comply with all ISBE rules.Our school district is committed to serving healthy meals to children, with plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free and low-fat milk; moderate in sodium, low in saturated fat, and zero grams trans fat per serving (nutrition label or manufacturer’s specification); and to meet the nutrition needs of school children within their calorie requirements. The school meal programs aim to improve the diet and health of school children, help mitigate childhood obesity, model healthy eating to support the development of lifelong healthy eating patterns, and support healthy choices while accommodating cultural food preferences and special dietary needs.

    All schools within the District, with the exception of Urbana Early Childhood School, participate in USDA’s National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP). Some school sites also participate in the After School Snack Program (ASCCP), the Supper Program (CACFP) and the Summer School Programs. Urbana Early Childhood School participates in the CACFP Snack Program.

    All schools within the District are committed to offering school meals through the NSLP and SBP programs, and other applicable Federal child nutrition programs, that:

  • Are accessible to all students;
  • Are appealing and attractive to children;
  • Are served in clean and pleasant settings;
  • Meet or exceed current nutrition requirements established by local, state, and Federal statutes and regulations. (The District offers reimbursable school meals that meet USDA nutrition standards.)
  • Promote healthy food and beverage choices using at least ten of the following Smarter Lunchroom techniques.
    Some examples include

    • Whole fruit options are displayed in attractive bowls or baskets
    • Sliced or cut fruit is available daily at elementary schools.
    • Daily fruit options are displayed in a location in the line of sight and reach of students
    • All available vegetable options have been given creative or descriptive names at the elementary schools.
    • All staff members, especially those serving, have been trained to politely prompt students to select and consume the daily vegetable options with their meal
    • White milk is placed in front of other beverages in all coolers
    • Healthy options are promoted via posters or signs within all service and dining areas
    • A reimbursable meal can be created in any service area available to students
    • Student surveys and taste testing opportunities are used to inform menu development, dining space decor, and promotional ideas
    • Student artwork is displayed in the service and/or dining areas
    • Daily announcements are used to promote and market menu optionsElementary schools are encouraged to schedule the lunch period following recess to better support learning and healthy eating.Exempted Fundraising Day (EFD) RequestsAll food and beverages sold to students on the school campuses of participating schools during the school day must comply with the “general nutrition standards for competitive foods “specified in federal law, unless the Superintendent or designee in a participating school has granted an exempted fundraising day (EFD).  To request an EFD and learn more about the District’s related procedures contact the Superintendent or designee.  The District’s procedures are subject to change.  The number of EFD’s is set by ISBE rule.

      Nutrition Promotion

      Nutrition promotion and education positively influence lifelong eating behaviors by using evidence-based techniques and nutrition messages, and by creating food environments that encourage healthy nutrition choices and encourage participation in school meal programs. Students and staff will receive consistent nutrition messages throughout schools, classrooms, gymnasiums, and cafeterias. Nutrition promotion also includes marketing and advertising nutritious foods and beverages to students and is most effective when implemented consistently through a comprehensive and multi-channel approach by school staff and teachers, parents, students, and the community.

      The District will promote healthy food and beverage choices for all students throughout the school campus, as well as encourage participation in school meal programs. This promotion will occur through at least:

    • Implementing evidence-based healthy food promotion techniques through the school meal programs using Smarter Lunchroom techniques; and
    • Promoting foods and beverages that meet the USDA Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards.Nutrition EducationThe District aims to teach, model, encourage, and support healthy eating by students. Schools will provide nutrition education that follows the Illinois Learning Standards for health curriculum.

4. Physical Activity

Children and adolescents should participate in 60 minutes of physical activity every day. A substantial percentage of students’ physical activity can be provided through a comprehensive, school-based physical activity program (CSPAP) that includes these components: physical education, recess, classroom-based physical activity, walk and bicycle to school, and out-of-school time activities and the district is committed to providing these opportunities. Schools will ensure that these varied opportunities are in addition to, and not as a substitute for, physical education (addressed in “Physical Education” subsection). All schools in the district will be encouraged to participate in Let’s Move! Active Schools (www.letsmoveschools.org) in order to successfully address all CSPAP areas.

It is recommended that physical activity during the school day (including but not limited to recess, physical activity breaks, or physical education) will not be withheld as punishment for any reason. This does not include participation on sports teams that have specific academic requirements. The district will provide teachers and other school staff with a list of ideas for alternative ways to discipline students.

During the school day all student will be required to engage in a daily physical education course unless otherwise exempted. See Board policy 6:60 Curriculum Content.

To the extent practicable, the District will ensure that its grounds and facilities are safe and that equipment is available to students to be active. The District will conduct necessary inspections and repairs.

5. Other Activities that Promote Student Wellness

The District will integrate wellness activities across the entire school setting The District will coordinate and integrate other initiatives related to physical activity, physical education, nutrition, and other wellness components so all efforts are complementary, and work towards the same set of goals and objectives promoting student well-being.

Schools in the District are encouraged to coordinate content across curricular areas that promote student health, with consultation provided by the District’s curriculum experts.

All efforts related to obtaining federal, state, or association recognition for efforts, or grants/funding opportunities for healthy school environments will complement the wellness policy.

All school-sponsored events will be encouraged to adhere to the wellness policy. All school-sponsored wellness events will include physical activity opportunities.

LEGAL REF.:        Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004, PL 108-265, Sec. 204.

Child Nutrition Act of 1966, 42 U.S.C. §1771 et seq.

National School Lunch Act, 42 U.S.C. §1758.

Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, 42 U.S.C. §1758b, PL 111-296.

42 U.S.C. §1779, as implemented by 7 C.F.R. §210.11.

105 ILCS 5/2-3.139.

23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 305, Food Program.

ISBE’s “School Wellness Policy” Goal, adopted Oct. 2007.

CROSS REF.:          4:120 (Food Services)

ADOPTED:           January 19, 2016

6:60 Curriculum Content

The curriculum shall contain instruction on subjects required by State statute or regulation as follows:

  1. In kindergarten through grade 8, subjects include: (a) language arts, (b) reading, (c) other communication skills, (d) science, (e) mathematics, (f) social studies, (g) art, (h) music, and (i) drug and substance abuse prevention. A reading opportunity of 60 minutes per day will be promoted for all students in kindergarten through grade 3 whose reading levels are one grade level or more lower than their current grade level.
  2. In grades 9 through 12, subjects include: (a) language arts, (b) writing intensive course, (c) science, (d) mathematics, (e) social studies including U.S. history, American government and, for students entering the 9th grade in the fall of 2016 and each year after it, one semester of civics, (f) foreign language, (g) music, (h) art, (i) driver and safety education, and (j) vocational education.

    Students otherwise eligible to take a driver education course must receive a passing grade in at least eight courses during the previous two semesters before enrolling in the course. The Superintendent or designee may waive this requirement if he or she believes a waiver to be in the student’s best interest. The course shall include: (a) classroom instruction on distracted driving as a major traffic safety issue, and (b) instruction concerning law enforcement procedures for traffic stops, including a demonstration of the proper actions to be taken during a traffic stop and appropriate interactions with law enforcement. Automobile safety instruction covering traffic regulations and highway safety must include instruction on the consequences of alcohol consumption and the operation of a motor vehicle. The eligibility requirements contained in State law for the receipt of a certificate of completion from the Secretary of State shall be provided to students in writing at the time of their registration.

  1. In grades 7 through 12, as well as in interscholastic athletic programs, steroid abuse prevention must be taught.
  2. In kindergarten through grade 12, provided it can be funded by private grants or the federal government, violence prevention and conflict resolution must be stressed, including: (a) causes of conflict, (b) consequences of violent behavior, (c) non-violent resolution, and (d) relationships between drugs, alcohol, and violence.
  3. In grades kindergarten through 12, age-appropriate Internet safety must be taught, the scope of which shall be determined by the Superintendent or designee. The curriculum must incorporate policy 6:235, Access to Electronic Networks and, at a minimum, include: (a) education about appropriate online behavior, (b) interacting with other individuals on social networking websites and in chat rooms, and (c) cyberbullying awareness and response.
  4. In all grades, character education must be taught including respect, responsibility, integrity, cooperation, compassion, and perseverance.
  5. Instruction in all grades should include educating students about behaviors that violate Board policy 7:180, Prevention of and Response to Bullying, Intimidation, and Harassment.
  6. In all schools, citizenship values must be taught, including: (a) patriotism, (b) democratic principles of freedom, justice, and equality, (c) proper use and display of the American flag, (d) the Pledge of Allegiance, and (e) the voting process.
  7. In all grades, physical education must be taught including a developmentally planned and sequential curriculum that fosters the development of movement skills, enhances health-related fitness, increases students’ knowledge, offers direct opportunities to learn how to work cooperatively in a group setting, and encourages healthy habits and attitudes for a healthy lifestyle. Unless otherwise exempted, all students are required to engage daily during the school day in a physical education course. For exemptions and substitutions, see policies 6:310, High School Credit for Non-District Experiences; Course Substitutions; Re-Entering Students and 7:260, Exemption from Physical Education
  8. In all schools, health education must be stressed, including: (a) proper nutrition, (b) physical fitness, (c) components necessary to develop a sound mind in a healthy body, (d) dangers and avoidance of abduction, and (e) age-appropriate sexual abuse and assault awareness and prevention education in all grades. The Superintendent shall implement a comprehensive health education program in accordance with State law.
  9. In all schools, career/vocational education must be taught, including: (a) the importance of work, (b) the development of basic skills to enter the world of work and/or continue formal education, (c) good work habits and values, (d) the relationship between learning and work, and (e) if possible, a student work program that provides the student with work experience as an extension of the regular classroom. A career awareness and exploration program must be available at all grade levels.
  10. In grades 9 through 12, consumer education must be taught, including: (a) financial literacy, including consumer debt and installment purchasing (including credit scoring, managing credit debt, and completing a loan application); budgeting; savings and investing; banking (including balancing a checkbook, opening a deposit account, and the use of interest rates); understanding simple contracts; State and federal income taxes; personal insurance policies; the comparison of prices; higher education student loans; identity-theft security; and homeownership (including the basic process of obtaining a mortgage and the concepts of fixed and adjustable rate mortgages, subprime loans, and predatory lending); and (b) the roles of consumers interacting with agriculture, business, labor unions and government in formulating and achieving the goals of the mixed free enterprise system.
  11. In all schools, conservation of natural resources must be taught, including: (a) home ecology, (b) endangered species, (c) threats to the environment, and (d) the importance of the environment to life as we know it.
  12. In all schools, United States history must be taught, including: (a) the principles of representative government, (b) the Constitutions of the U.S. and Illinois, (c) the role of the U.S. in world affairs, (d) the role of labor unions, and (e) the role and contributions of ethnic groups, including but not limited to, the African Americans, Albanians, Asian Americans, Bohemians, Czechs, French, Germans, Hispanics (including the events related to the forceful removal and illegal deportation of Mexican-American U.S. citizens during the Great Depression), Hungarians, Irish, Italians, Lithuanians, Polish, Russians, Scots, and Slovakians in the history of this country and State.

    In addition, all schools shall hold an educational program on the United States Constitution on Constitution Day, each September 17, commemorating the September 17, 1787 signing of the Constitution. However, when September 17 falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday, Constitution Day shall be held during the preceding or following week.

  1. In grade 7 and all high school courses concerning U.S. history or a combination of U.S. history and American government, students must view a Congressional Medal of Honor film made by the Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation, provided there is no cost for the film.
  2. In all schools, the curriculum includes a unit of instruction on the Holocaust and crimes of genocide, including Nazi atrocities of 1933-1945, Armenian Genocide, the Famine-Genocide in Ukraine, and more recent atrocities in Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda, and Sudan.
  3. In all schools, the curriculum includes a unit of instruction on the history, struggles, and contributions of women.
  4. In all schools, the curriculum includes a unit of instruction on Black History, including the history of the African slave trade, slavery in America, and the vestiges of slavery in this country, as well as the struggles and contributions of African-Americans.
  5. In all schools offering a secondary agricultural education program, courses as required by 105 ILCS 5/2-3.80.
  6. In all schools, instruction during courses as determined by the Superintendent or designee on disability history, awareness, and the disability rights movement.

LEGAL REF.:        5 ILCS 465/3 and 465/3a.

20 ILCS 2605/2605-480.

105 ILCS 5/2-3.80(e) and (f), 5/27-3, 5/27-3.5, 5/27-5, 5/27-6, 5/27-6.5, 5/27-7, 5/27-12, 5/27-12.1, 5/27-13.1, 5/27-13.2, 5/27-20.3, 5/27-20.4, 5/27-20.5, 5/27-21, 5/27-22, 5/27-23.3, 5/27-23.4, 5/27-23.7, 5/27-23.8, 5/27-23.10, 5/27-24.2, 435/, and 110/3.

625 ILCS 5/6-408.5.             

23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.420, 1.425, 1.430, and 1.440.

Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2005, Pub. L. No. 108-447, Section 111 of Division J.

Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act, Pub. L. No. 110-385, Title II, 122 stat. 4096 (2008).

47 C.F.R. §54.520.

CROSS REF.:          6:20 (School Year Calendar and Day), 6:40 (Curriculum Development), 6:70 (Teaching About Religions), 6:235 (Access to Electronic Networks), 7:180 (Prevention of and Response to Bullying, Intimidation, and Harassment, 7:185 (Teen Dating Violence Prohibited), 7:190 (Student Behavior); 7:260 (Exemption from Physical Education)

ADOPTED:           February 21, 2017

  • 6:65 Student Social and Emotional Development

    The Board of Education recognizes that students’ mental health is important to their overall health, well-being, and academic success. It is the policy of the Board of Education to incorporate social and emotional development into the district’s educational program which shall be consistent with the social and emotional development standards developed by the Illinois State Board of Education as part of the Illinois Learning Standards.

    Protocols shall be developed to respond to children with social, emotional, or mental health problems that impact learning ability. The protocols and administrative procedures will involve the following core components:

    1. Classroom-wide and school-wide programming to teach social and emotional skills, promote optimal mental health, and decrease risk behaviors for students;
    2. Staff development and training to school personnel to enhance students’ social, emotional, and academic learning;
    3. Opportunities for parent and family involvement to learn about the importance of their children’s optimal social and emotional development and ways to enhance it;
    4. Development of partnerships with community agencies and organizations to assist in a coordinated approach to addressing children’s mental health and social and emotional development;
    5. Early identification and intervention by development of a periodic screening mechanism to assess those students who have significant risk factors for social, emotional, or mental health problems that impact learning;
    6. Improve treatment of children with social, emotional, and mental health issues that impact learning through student and family support services, school-based behavioral health services, and school-community linked services and supports;
    7. Development of systems to assess and report baseline information and ongoing progress about school climate, students’ social and emotional development, and academic performance.

    LEGAL REF.:        Children’s Mental Health Act of 2003, 405 ILCS 49/1 et seq.

    CROSS REF.:          6:270 (Guidance and Counseling Program), 7:100 (Health, Eye, and Dental Examinations; Immunizations; and Exclusion of Students), 7:180 (Prevention of and Response to Bullying, Intimidation, and Harassment); 7:250 (Student Support Services)

    ADOPTED:           January 19, 2010

6:70 Teaching About Religions

The School District’s curriculum may include the study of religions as they relate to geography, history, culture, and the development of various ethnic groups.  The study of religions shall give neither preferential nor derogatory treatment to any single religious belief or to religion in general.  The study of religions shall be treated as an academic subject with no emphasis on the advancement or practice of religion.

LEGAL REF.:        School Dist. of Abington Twp v. Schempp, 374 U.S. 203 (1963).

Allegheny County v. ACLU Pittsburgh Chapter, 492 U.S. 573, 109 S.Ct. 3086, 106 L.Ed.2d 472 (1989).

CROSS REF.:         6:20 (School Year Calendar and Day), 6:40 (Curriculum Development), 6:60 (Curriculum Content), 6:255 (Assemblies and Ceremonies)

ADOPTED:            June 27, 2012

6:80 Teaching About Controversial Issues

The Superintendent shall ensure that all school-sponsored presentations and discussions of controversial or sensitive topics in the instructional program, including those made by guest speakers, are:

  • Age-appropriate. Proper decorum, considering the students’ ages, should be followed.
  • Consistent with the curriculum and serve an educational purpose.
  • Informative and present a balanced view.
  • Respectful of the rights and opinions of everyone. Emotional criticisms and hurtful sarcasm should be avoided.
  • Not tolerant of profanity or slander. Disruptive conduct is prohibited and may subject a student to discipline.

The District specifically reserves its right to stop any school-sponsored activity that it determines violates this policy, is harmful to the District or the students, or violates State or federal law.

This policy applies to all personnel to the extent that it does not conflict with the Agreement between Urbana Education (Certified) Association, IEA-NEA and Urbana School District #116 Board of Education or individual contract; in the event of a conflict, the bargaining agreement or individual agreement will control.

CROSS REF.: 6:40 (Curriculum Development), 6:255 (Assemblies and Ceremonies)

ADOPTED: January 19, 2010

Rev. 02/10

6:100 Using Animals in the Educational Program

Animals may be brought into school facilities for educational purposes according to procedures developed by the Superintendent assuring: (a) the animal is appropriately housed, humanely cared for, and properly handled, and (b) students will not be exposed to a dangerous animal or an unhealthy environment.

Animal Experiments

Experiments on living animals are prohibited; however, behavior studies that do not impair an animal’s health or safety are permissible.

Animal Dissection

The dissection of dead animals or parts of dead animals shall be allowed in the classroom only when the dissection exercise contributes to or is a part of an illustration of pertinent study materials. All dissection of animals shall be confined to the classroom and must comply with the School Code.

Students who object to performing, participating in, or observing the dissection of animals are excused from classroom attendance without penalty during times when such activities are taking place. No student will be penalized or disciplined for refusing to perform, participate in, or observe a dissection. The Superintendent or designee shall inform students of: (1) their right to refrain from performing, participating in, or observing dissection, and (2) which courses contain a dissection unit and which of those courses offers an alternative project.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/2-3.122, 5/27-14, and 112/1 et seq.

CROSS REF.:          6:40 (Curriculum Development)

ADOPTED:           October 18, 2016

6:110 Programs for Students At Risk of Academic Failure and/or Dropping Out of School and Graduation Incentives Program

The Superintendent or designee shall develop, maintain, and supervise a program for students at risk of academic failure or dropping out of school. The program shall include education and support services addressing individual learning styles, career development, and social needs, and may include without limitation one or more of the following:

  • Parent-teacher conferences
  • Counseling services by social workers and/or guidance counselors
  • Counseling services by psychologists
  • Psychological testing
  • Truants’ alternative and optional education program
  • Alternative school placement
  • Community agency services
  • Alternative learning opportunities program, in conformity with the Alternative Learning Opportunities Law, as it may be amended from time-to-time
  • Graduation incentives program
  • Remediation program

Any student who is below the age of 20 years is eligible to enroll in a graduation incentives program if he or she:

  1. Is considered a dropout according to State law;
  2. Has been suspended or expelled;
  3. Is pregnant or is a parent;
  4. Has been assessed as chemically dependent; or
  5. Is enrolled in a bilingual education or English Language Learners program.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/2-3.41, 5/2-3.66, 5/10-20.9a, 5/13B, 5/26-2a, 5/26-13, 5/26-14, and 5/26-16.

CROSS REF.:          6:280, (Grading and Promotion), 6:300 (Graduation Requirements), 7:70 (Attendance and Truancy)

ADOPTED:           May 5, 2015

6:120 Education of Children with Disabilities

The School District shall provide a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment and necessary related services to all children with disabilities enrolled in the District, as required by the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and implementing provisions of the School Code, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans With Disabilities Act.  The term “children with disabilities,” as used in this policy, means children between ages 3 and 21 (inclusive) for whom it is determined, through definitions and procedures described in the Illinois State Board of Education’s Special Education rules, that special education services are needed.

It is the intent of the District to ensure that students who are disabled within the definition of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 are identified, evaluated, and provided with appropriate educational services.  Students may be disabled within the meaning of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act even though they do not require services pursuant to the IDEA.

For students eligible for services under IDEA, the District shall follow procedures for identification, evaluation, placement, and delivery of services to children with disabilities provided in the Illinois State Board of Education’s Special Education rules.  For those students who are not eligible for services under IDEA, but, because of disability as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, need or are believed to need special instruction or related services, the District shall establish and implement a system of procedural safeguards.  The safeguards shall cover students’ identification, evaluation, and educational placement. This system shall include notice, an opportunity for the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) to examine relevant records, an impartial hearing with opportunity for participation by the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s), representation by counsel, and a review procedure.

The District may maintain membership in one or more cooperative associations of school districts that shall assist the District in fulfilling its obligations to the District’s disabled students.

If necessary, students may also be placed in nonpublic special education programs or education facilities.

LEGAL REF.:        Americans With Disabilities Act, 42 U.S.C. §12101 et seq. Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, 20 U.S.C. §1400 et seq. Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, 29 U.S.C. §794. 105 ILCS 5/14-1.01 et seq., 5/14-7.02, and 5/14-7.02b. 23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 226. 34 C.F.R. §300.

CROSS REF.:          2:150 (Committees), 7:230 (Misconduct by Students with Disabilities)

ADOPTED:           December 17, 2013

6:130 Program for the Gifted

The Superintendent or designee shall design an education program for gifted and talented students that is responsive to community needs while complying with Section 14A-30 of The School Code in order to qualify for State funding, should such funding become available.

Eligibility to participate in the gifted program shall not be conditioned upon race, religion, sex, disability, or any factor other than the student’s identification as gifted or talented.

In order to allow the Board of Education to monitor this policy, the Superintendent or designee shall report at least annually on the status of the District’s gifted program.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/14A-5 et seq.

ADOPTED: January 19, 2010

Rev. 02/10

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6:140 Education of Homeless Children

Each child of a homeless individual and each homeless youth has equal access to the same free, appropriate public education as provided to other children and youths, including a public pre-school education. A homeless child is defined as provided in the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and the Ill. Education for Homeless Children Act. The Superintendent or designee shall act as or appoint a Liaison for Homeless Children to coordinate this policy’s implementation.

A homeless child may attend the District school that the child attended when permanently housed or in which the child was last enrolled. A homeless child living in any District school’s attendance area may attend that school.

The Superintendent or designee shall review and revise rules or procedures that may act as barriers to the enrollment of homeless children and youths. In reviewing and revising such procedures, consideration shall be given to issues concerning transportation, immunization, residency, birth certificates, school records and other documentation, and guardianship. Transportation shall be provided in accordance with the McKinney Homeless Assistance Act and State law. The Superintendent or designee shall give special attention to ensuring the enrollment and attendance of homeless children and youths who are not currently attending school. If a child is denied enrollment or transportation under this policy, the Liaison for Homeless Children shall immediately refer the child or his or her parent/guardian to the ombudsperson appointed by the Regional Superintendent and provide the child or his or her parent/guardian with a written explanation for the denial.   Whenever a child and his or her parent/guardian who initially share the housing of another person due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar hardship continue to share the housing, the Liaison for Homeless Children shall, after the passage of 18 months and annually thereafter, conduct a review as to whether such hardship continues to exist in accordance with State law.

LEGAL REF.:        McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. §11431 et seq.

Ill. Education for Homeless Children Act, 105 ILCS 45/.

CROSS REF.:          2:260 (Uniform Grievance Procedure), 4:110 (Transportation), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunities), 7:30 (Student Assignment), 7:50 (School Admissions and Student Transfers To and From Non-District Schools), 7:60 (Residence), 7:100 (Health, Eye, and Dental Examinations; Immunizations; and Exclusion of Students)

ADOPTED:           November 17, 2015

  • 6:145 Migrant Students

    The Superintendent will develop and implement a program to address the needs of migrant children in the District.

    This program will include a means to:

    1. Identify migrant students and assess their educational and related health and social needs.
    2. Provide a full range of services to migrant students through appropriate local, State and federal educational programs, including applicable Title I programs, special education, gifted education, vocational education, language programs, counseling programs, and elective classes.
    3. Provide migrant children with full and appropriate opportunities to meet the same challenging State academic standards that all children are expected to meet.
    4. Provide advocacy and outreach programs to migrant children and their families and professional development for District staff.
    5. Provide programs, activities, and procedures for the engagement of parents/guardians and family members of migrant students in an understandable format and language.

    Migrant Education Program for Parent/Guardian and Family Member Engagement

    Parents/guardians and family members of migrant students will be involved in and regularly consulted about the development, implementation, operation, and evaluation of the migrant program.

    Parents/guardians and family members of migrant students will receive instruction regarding their role in improving the academic achievement of their children.

    LEGAL REF.:        20 U.S.C. §6318.

                                  20 U.S.C. §6391 et seq.

    34 C.F.R. §200.80 et seq.

    CROSS REF.:          6:170 (Title I Programs)

    ADOPTED:           February 21, 2017

6:150 Home and Hospital Instruction

A student who is absent from school, or whose physician anticipates that the student will be absent from school, because of a medical condition may be eligible for instruction in the student’s home or hospital. Eligibility shall be determined by State law and the Illinois State Board of Education rules governing (1) the continuum of placement options for students who have been identified for special education services or (2) the home and hospital instruction provisions for students who have not been identified for special education services. Appropriate educational services from qualified staff will begin no later than 5 school days after receiving a physician’s written statement. Instructional or related services for a student receiving special education services will be determined by the student’s individualized education program.

A student who is unable to attend school because of pregnancy will be provided home instruction, correspondence courses, or other courses of instruction (1) before the birth of the child when the student’s physician indicates, in writing, that she is medically unable to attend regular classroom instruction, and (2) for up to 3 months after the child’s birth or a miscarriage.

Periodic conferences will be held between appropriate school personnel, parent(s)/guardian(s), and hospital staff to coordinate course work and facilitate a student’s return to school.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-22.6a, 5/14-13.01, 5/18-4.5, and 5/18-8.05.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.520, 1.610, and 226.300.

CROSS REF.:          6:120 (Education of Children with Disabilities), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunity), 7:280 (Communicable and Chronic Infectious Disease)

ADOPTED:           January 20, 2015

6:160 English Learners

The District offers opportunities for resident English Learners to achieve at high levels in academic subjects and to meet the same challenging State academic standards that all children are expected to meet. The Superintendent or designee shall develop and maintain a program for English Learners that will:

  1. Assist all English Learners to achieve English proficiency, facilitate effective communication in English, and encourage their full participation in school activities and programs as well as promote participation by the parents/guardians of English Learners.
  2. Appropriately identify students with limited English language proficiency.
  3. Comply with State law regarding the Transitional Bilingual Educational Program (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI), whichever is applicable.
  4. Comply with any applicable State and federal requirements for the receipt of grant money for English Learners and programs to serve them.
  5. Determine the appropriate instructional program and environment for English Learners.
  6. Annually assess the English proficiency of English Learners and monitor their progress in order to determine their readiness for a mainstream classroom environment. 
  7. Include English Learners, to the extent required by State and federal law, in the District’s student assessment program to measure their achievement in reading/language arts and mathematics.
  8. Provide information to the parents/guardians of English Learners about: (1) the reasons for their child’s identification, (2) their child’s level of English proficiency, (3) the method of instruction to be used, (4) how the program will meet their child’s needs, (5) how the program will specifically help their child learn English and meet age-appropriate academic achievement standards for grade promotion and graduation, (6) specific exit requirements of the program, (7) how the program will meet their child’s individualized education program, if applicable, and (8) information on parent/guardian rights. Parents/guardians will be regularly apprised of their child’s progress and involvement will be encouraged.

Parent Involvement

Parents/guardians of English Learners will be informed how they can: (1) be involved in the education of their children, and (2) be active participants in assisting their children to attain English proficiency, achieve at high levels within a well-rounded education, and meet the challenging State academic standards expected of all students.

LEGAL REF.:        20 U.S.C. §§6312, 6314, 6315, and 6318.

                              20 U.S.C. §6801 et seq.

34 C.F.R. Part 200.

105 ILCS 5/14C-1 et seq.

23 Ill.Admin.Code Part 228.

CROSS REF.:          6:15 (School Accountability), 6:170 (Title I Programs), 6:340 (Student Testing and Assessment Program)

ADOPTED:           February 21, 2017

6:170 Title I Programs

The Superintendent or designee shall pursue funding under Title I, Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, to supplement instructional services and activities in order to improve the educational opportunities of educationally disadvantaged or deprived children.

All District schools, regardless of whether they receive Title I funds, shall provide services that, taken as a whole, are substantially comparable. Teachers, administrators, and other staff shall be assigned to schools in a manner that ensures equivalency among the District’s schools. Curriculum materials and instructional supplies shall be provided in a manner that ensures equivalency among the District’s schools.

Title I Parent and Family Engagement

The District maintains programs, activities, and procedures for the engagement of parents/guardians and families of students receiving services, or enrolled in programs, under Title I. These programs, activities, and procedures are described in District-level and School-level compacts.

District-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact

The Superintendent or designee shall develop a District-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact according to Title I requirements. The District-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact shall contain: (1) the District’s expectations for parent and family engagement, (2) specific strategies for effective parent and family engagement activities to improve student academic achievement and school performance, and (3) other provisions as required by federal law. The Superintendent or designee shall ensure that the Compact is distributed to parents/guardians of students receiving services, or enrolled in programs, under Title I.

School-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact

Each Building Principal or designee shall develop a School-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact according to Title I requirements. This School-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact shall contain: (1) a process for continually involving parents/guardians in its development and implementation, (2) how parents/guardians, the entire school staff, and students share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement, (3) the means by which the school and parents/guardians build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the State’s high standards, and (4) other provisions as required by federal law. Each Building Principal or designee shall ensure that the Compact is distributed to parents/guardians of students receiving services, or enrolled in programs, under Title I.

Incorporated

by Reference:         6:170-AP1, E1 (District-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact) and 6:170-AP1, E2 (School-Level Parent and Family Engagement Compact)

LEGAL REF.:        Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, 20 U.S.C. §6301‑6514.

CROSS REF.:          2:260 (Uniform Grievance Procedure), 4:110 (Transportation), 5:190 (Teacher Qualifications), 5:280 (Duties and Qualifications), 6:15 (School Accountability), 6:140 (Education of Homeless Children), 6:145 (Migrant Students), 6:160 (English Learners), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunities), 7:30 (Student Assignment), 7:60 (Residence), 7:100 (Health, Eye, and Dental Examinations; Immunizations; and Exclusion of Students), 8:95 (Parental Involvement)

ADOPTED:           February 21, 2017

6:185 Remote Educational Program

The Superintendent may develop, maintain, and supervise a remote educational program consistent with Section 10-29 of the School Code. The remote educational program shall provide an opportunity for qualifying students to participate in an educational program delivered by the District in a location outside of a school.

The remote educational program shall:

  1. Align its curriculum with the Illinois State Learning Standards and Board policies 6:10, Educational Philosophy and Objectives and 6:15, School Accountability.
  2. Offer instruction and educational experiences consistent with those given to students at the same grade level in the District through compliance with Board policies 6:30, Organization of Instruction and 6:300, Graduation Requirements.
  3. Provide instructors that meet the teacher qualifications in Board policy 5:190, Teacher Qualifications. Instructors are responsible for the following elements of the program:
  4. Planning instruction,
  5. Diagnosing learning needs,
  6. Prescribing content delivery through class activities,
  7. Assessing learning,
  8. Reporting outcomes to administrators and parents/guardians, and
  9. Evaluating the effects of instruction.
  10. Provide a remote educational program anytime during the period of time from and including the opening date to the closing date of the District’s regular school term. It may operate on any calendar day, notwithstanding whether it is a student attendance day or institute day on the School District’s calendar or any other provision of law restricting instruction on that day. The District’s regular school term is established by Board policies 2:20, Powers and Duties of the School Board;Indemnification and 6:20, School Year Calendar and Day. The remote educational program may be offered outside of the regular school term as part of any authorized summer school program.
  11. Calculate the number of clock hours a student participates in instruction in alignment with Board policy 6:20, School Year Calendar and Day.
  12. Limit participation to students who are juniors or seniors or demonstrate individual educational need(s). Approval of students in the program will be on a space-available basis.
  13. Authorize the Superintendent or designee to approve students for participation in the program when the student shows evidence of:
  14. Enrollment in the District pursuant to Board policies 7:60, Residence and 7:30, Student Assignment and Intra-District Transfer.
  15. Prior approval from their individualized educational program (IEP) team, if applicable.
  16. How the remote educational program best serves the student’s individual learning needs.
  17. A consistent, appropriate attendance record, no disciplinary record, and a 2.5 minimum grade point average.
  18. Include a process for developing and approving a written remote educational plan for each student participating in the program.
  19. Require students to complete their participation in the program within 12 months, unless the student’s participation is extended by the District.
  20. Require students to participate in all assessments administered by the District pursuant to State and federal law and Board policy 6:340, Student Testing and Assessment Program.
  21. Align with the requirements of Board policy 7:340, Student Records.
  22. Comply with other State and federal laws and align with all applicable Board policies. This includes the Superintendent submitting a copy of this policy to the Illinois State Board of Education along with any amendments to it and any data on student participation.
  23. Be monitored by the Board pursuant to Board policy 2:240, Board Policy Development and included as a topic for discussion in the annual report required by Board policy 6:10, Educational Philosophy and Objectives. It shall include a discussion of the process for renewal of the program when applicable.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-29.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §226.360.

CROSS REF.:          2:20 (Powers and Duties of the Board of Education; Indemnification), 2:240 (Board Policy Development), 5:190 (Teacher Qualifications), 6:10 (Educational Philosophy and Objectives) 6:15 (School Accountability), 6:20 (School Year Calendar and Day), 6:30 (Organization of Instruction), 6:300 (Graduation Requirements), 6:340 (Student Testing and Assessment Program), 7:30 (Student Assignment and Intra-District Transfer), 7:60 (Residence), 7:340 (Student Records)

ADOPTED:           June 5, 2012

6:190 Extracurricular and Co-Curricular Activities

Extracurricular or co-curricular activities are school-sponsored programs for which some or all of the activities are outside the instructional day.  They do not include field trips, homework, or occasional work required outside the school day for a scheduled class. “Co-curricular activity” refers to an activity associated with the curriculum in a regular classroom and is generally required for class credit.  “Extracurricular activity” refers to an activity that is not part of the curriculum, is not graded, does not offer credit, and does not take place during classroom time; it includes competitive interscholastic activities and clubs.

The Superintendent must approve an activity in order for it to be considered a District-sponsored extracurricular or co-curricular activity, using the following criteria:

  1. The activity will contribute to the leadership abilities, social well-being, self-realization, good citizenship, or general growth of student-participants.
  2. Fees assessed students are reasonable and do not exceed the actual cost of operation.
  3. The District has sufficient financial resources for the activity.
  4. Requests from students.
  5. The activity will be supervised by a school-approved sponsor.

Non-school sponsored student groups are governed by School Board policy, 7:330, Student Use of Buildings – Equal Access.

Academic Criteria for Participation

For students in kindergarten through 8th grade, selection of members or participants is at the discretion of the teachers, sponsors, or coaches, provided that the selection criteria conform to the District’s policies.  Students must satisfy all academic standards and must comply with the activity’s rules and the student conduct code.

For high school students, selection of members or participants is at the discretion of the teachers, sponsors, or coaches, provided that the selection criteria conform to the District’s policies.  Participation in co-curricular activities is dependent upon course selection and successful progress in those courses.  In order to be eligible to participate in any school-sponsored or school-supported athletic or extracurricular activity, a student must maintain passing work in at least five (5) subjects (twenty-five (25) hours).  Any student-participant failing to meet these academic criteria shall be suspended from the activity for 7 calendar days.

Please refer to the High School Extracurricular Conduct Code.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-20.30 and 5/24-24.

CROSS REF.:          4:170 (Safety), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunities), 7:40 (Nonpublic School Students, Including Parochial and Home-Schooled Students), 7:240 (Conduct Code for Participants in Extracurricular Activities), 7:300 (Extracurricular Athletics), 7:330 (Student Use of Buildings – Equal Access); 8:20 (Community Use of School Facilities)

ADOPTED:           September 3, 2013

6:210 Instructional Materials

All District classrooms and learning centers should be equipped with an evenly-proportioned, wide assortment of instructional materials, including textbooks, workbooks, audio-visual materials, and electronic materials. These materials should provide quality learning experiences for students and:

  1. Enrich and support the curriculum;
  2. Stimulate growth in knowledge, literary appreciation, aesthetic values, and ethical standards;
  3. Provide background information to enable students to make informed judgments and promote critical reading and thinking;
  4. Depict in an accurate and unbiased way the cultural diversity and pluralistic nature of American society; and
  5. Contribute to a sense of the worth of all people regardless of sex, race, religion, nationality, ethnic origin, sexual orientation, disability, or any other differences that may exist.

The Superintendent or designee shall annually provide a list of textbooks and instructional materials used in the District to the Board of Education. Anyone may inspect any textbook or instructional material.

Teachers are encouraged to use supplemental material only when it will enhance, or otherwise illustrate, the subjects being taught and to ensure it is age-appropriate. No R-rated movie shall be shown to students unless prior approval is received from the Superintendent or designee, and no movie rated NC-17 (no one 17 and under admitted) shall be shown under any circumstances. These restrictions apply to television programs and other media with equivalent ratings. The Superintendent or designee shall give parents/guardians an opportunity to request that their child not participate in a class showing a movie, television program, or other media with an R or equivalent rating.

Instructional Materials Selection and Adoption

The Superintendent shall approve the selection of textbooks and instructional materials according to the standards described in this policy. The Superintendent shall recommend to the Board the adoption of any District-wide textbooks. The School Code governs the adoption and purchase of textbooks and instructional materials.

LEGAL REF.: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.8, 5/10-20.9, and 5/28-19.1.

CROSS REF.: 6:30 (Organization of Instruction), 6:40 (Curriculum Development), 6:80 (Teaching About Controversial Issues), 6:170 (Title I Programs), 6:260 (Complaints About Curriculum, Instructional Materials, and Programs), 7:10 (Equal Educational Opportunities), 7:15 (Student and Family Privacy Rights), 8:110 (Public Suggestions and Complaints)

ADOPTED: January 19, 2010

Rev. 02/10

6:230 Library Media Program

  1. The program includes an organizeThe Superintendent or designee shall manage the District’s library media program to comply with, (1) State law and Illinois State Board of Education rule, and (2) the following standards:d collection of resources available to students and staff to supplement classroom instruction, foster reading for pleasure, enhance information literacy, and support research, as appropriate to students of all abilities in the grade levels served.
  2. Financial resources for the program’s resources and supplies are allocated to meet students’ needs.
  3. Students in all grades served have equitable access to library media resources.
  4. The advice of an individual who is qualified according to ISBE rule is sought regarding the overall direction of the program, including the selection and organization of materials, provision of instruction in information and technology literacy, and structuring the work of library paraprofessionals.
  5. Staff members are invited to recommend additions to the collection.
  6. Students may freely select resource center materials as well as receive guided selection of materials appropriate to specific, planned learning experiences.

LEGAL REF: 23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420(o).

CROSS REF.: 6:60 (Curriculum Content), 6:170 (Title I Programs), 6:210 (Instructional Materials)

ADOPTED: January 19, 2010

    • I will not use the network for illegal purposes such as: arranging for a drug sale or purchase of alcohol, engaging in criminal gang activity, threatening the safety of a person, etc.
    • I will not participate in any activity that violates school rules or local, state or federal laws.

      6:235 Access to Electronic Networks

      Internet Acceptable Use Policy (IAUP)

      We are pleased to offer students of the Urbana School District #116 access to the District computer network for electronic mail and the Internet. To gain access to e-mail and the Internet, all students under the age of 18 must obtain parental permission and must sign and return this form each year to the school office. Students 18 and over may sign their own forms.

      Access to e-mail and the internet will enable students to explore thousands of libraries and databases while exchanging messages with internet users throughout the world. Families should be warned that some material accessible via the Internet may contain items that are illegal, defamatory, inaccurate or potentially offensive to some people. While our intent is to make Internet access available to further educational goals and objectives, students may find ways to access other materials as well. We believe that the benefits to students from access to the Internet, in the form of information resources and opportunities for collaboration, exceed any disadvantages. But ultimately, parents and guardians of minors are responsible for setting and conveying the standards that their children should follow when using media and information sources. To that end, Urbana School District #116 supports and respects each family’s right to decide whether or not to apply for access.

      District Internet and E-mail Rules

      Students are responsible for good behavior on school computer networks as they are in a classroom or school hallway. Communications on the network are often public in nature. General school rules for behavior and communications apply.

      The network is provided for students to conduct research and communicate with others. Access to network services is given to students who agree to act in a considerate and responsible manner. Parent permission is required. Access is a privilege – NOT A RIGHT. Access entails responsibility.

      Individual users of the District computer networks are responsible for their behavior and communications over our network. It is presumed that users will comply with District standards and will honor the agreements they have signed. Beyond the clarification of such standards, the District is not responsible for restricting, monitoring or controlling the communications of individuals utilizing the network.

      Network storage areas may be treated like school lockers. Network administrators may review files and communications to maintain system integrity and insure that users are using the system responsibly. Users should not expect that files stored on District servers will always be private. During school, teachers of younger students will guide them toward appropriate materials. Outside of school, families bear the same responsibility for such guidance as they exercise with information sources such as television, telephones, movies, radio and other potentially offensive media.

      As outlined in Board policy and procedures on students’ rights and responsibilities, copies of which are available in school offices, the following are NOT permitted:

      • sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures
      • using obscene language
      • harassing, insulting or attacking others
      • damaging computers, computer systems or computer networks
      • violating copyright laws
      • using another’s password
      • trespassing in another’s folders, work or files
      • intentionally wasting limited resources
      • employing the network for commercial purposes
      • accessing games, IRC (chats), MUD’s, MOO’s, MUVE’s or other similar sites without permission from a teacher

      Violations may result in a loss of access as well as other disciplinary or legal actions.

      Top Six Things to Know Prior to Using the Internet

      1. The Internet is a network of computers and computer networks that provides access to information contained on millions of computers around the world.
      2. Because the information on the Internet comes from all over the world, we need to understand that neither Urbana School District #116 nor any staff member controls the content of this information. Some information may be controversial, offensive, or inaccurate.
      3. The Internet is a powerful resource tool. When at school, students should use it under the direction and guidance of professional staff for educational purposes only.
      4. Any information that is available on the internet is the product of another individual’s work, and must be cited if used. This information is referred to as intellectual property and includes pictures, logos, trademarks, printed materials, computer software, video and sounds.
      5. The Internet allows students not only to receive information, but to send it to others. In light of that, students should behave in a responsible manner when communicating electronically.
      6. Urbana School District #116 uses a filtering/blocking software, it is important to note that no filtering/blocking software is 100% guaranteed and must be paired with supervision and good parental involvement.

      Online Rules

      Personal Safety and Respecting Privacy

      • I will not share my or any other person’s address, passwords, ID’s, telephone number, parent’s work address/telephone number, the name and location of my school or other personal information. If participating in an approved classroom project, name and location of school may be used.
      • I will tell my teachers right away if I come across any information that makes me feel uncomfortable.
      • I will never agree to get together with someone I “meet” online.
      • I will never send a person my picture or anything else without first checking with my teachers and parents.
      • I will not respond to any messages that are mean, use bad language or in any way make me feel uncomfortable. It is not my fault if I get a message like that. If I do I will tell my teachers right away.
      • I will not give out a credit card number online, subscribe to any services or order any materials or services on the Internet.
      • I will respect individual’s rights to privacy and to freedom from intimidation, harassment, and unwarranted annoyance.
      • I recognize the limitations to privacy afforded by electronic services.

      Illegal Activities

    • I will not use the network for illegal purposes such as: arranging for a drug sale or purchase of alcohol, engaging in criminal gang activity, threatening the safety of a person, etc.
    • I will not participate in any activity that violates school rules or local, state or federal laws.

    Respecting Resource

    • I will abide by security restrictions on all systems and information to which access is permitted. I will not attempt to evade, disable, or “crack” passwords or other security provisions. I understand that these activities threaten the work of others and are grounds for immediate termination or suspension of privileges and possible further sanctions.
    • I understand that the following is not permitted:
    • sending or displaying offensive messages or pictures using obscene language
    • trespassing in another’s folders, work or files
    • using another’s password
    • using the network for commercial purposes

    Acceptable Access

    • I understand I may not play non-educational games or use other interactive sites such as IRC (chats), social networks (Facebook, Myspace, etc., MUD’s (Multiple User Domains), MOO’s (MUD Object Oriented), or MUVE (Multiple User Virtual Environments) unless specifically assigned to do so by a teacher.
    • I will not make deliberate attempts to disrupt the computer system, damage or interfere in any way with an individual, a business, or an organization’s data by spreading a virus or by any other means. These actions are illegal.
    • I am responsible for my individual account and will not share my password with others, nor will I access the network or other information source without proper authorization.
    • I will not use another person’s account to send or receive email.

    Plagiarism and Copyright Infringement

    • I will not plagiarize any materials (documents, web pages, software, graphics, etc.) that I find on the Internet. Plagiarism is taking the ideas or writings of others and presenting them as if they were yours.
    • I will respect copyright and other intellectual-property rights. Unauthorized copying of files or passwords belonging to others may constitute plagiarism or theft. Modifying files without authorization (including altering information, introducing viruses, or damaging files) is unethical, may be illegal, and may lead to sanctions.
    • The Urbana School District #116 does not condone and specifically forbids the unauthorized duplication of software.

    Sanctions:

    • Violating these rules may result in a loss of access.
    • Additional disciplinary action may be taken at the building level in line with existing practice regarding inappropriate language or behavior.
    • Legal action will be taken when applicable.

    Users Agreement and Parent Permission Form for Internet and Email Access (pdf)

    Users Agreement and Parent Permission Form for Internet and Email Access

    (IAUP)

    As a user of the Urbana School District #116 computer network, I hereby agree to comply with the above stated rules – utilizing and communicating over the network in a responsible fashion while honoring all relevant laws and restrictions.

    Name (Please Print)_______________________________________________

    Student Signature_________________________________________________

    Date____________________________________________________________

    As a parent or legal guardian of the minor student signing above, I grant permission for my son or daughter to access networked computer services such as electronic mail and the Internet.

    I understand that individuals and families may be held liable for violations. I understand that some materials on the Internet may be objectionable, but I accept responsibility for guidance of Internet use – setting and conveying standards for my daughter or son to follow when selecting, sharing or exploring information. If I want to revoke this permission I need to send a written request to the principal of my student’s school.

    As a parent or legal guardian of the minor student signing above, I do NOT grant permission for my son or daughter to access networked computer services such as electronic mail and the Internet.

    (PLEASE PRINT)

    Name of Student__________________________________________________

    School______________________________ Grade_______________________

    Student ID #_________________________ Date of Birth_________________

    Street Address____________________________________________________

    Home Telephone__________________________________________________

    Parent Signature__________________________________________________

    Date         ___________

 

 

 

LEGAL REF.:        No Child Left Behind Act, 20 U.S.C. §6777.

Children’s Internet Protection Act, 47 U.S.C. §254(h) and (l).

Enhancing Education Through Technology Act, 20 U.S.C §6751 et seq.

720 ILCS 5/26.5.

CROSS REF.:    5:100 (Staff Development Program), 5:170 (Copyright), 6:40 (Curriculum Development), 6:210 (Instructional Materials), 6:230 (Media Center), 6:260 (Complaints About Curriculum, Instructional Materials, and Programs), 7:130 (Student Rights and Responsibilities), 7:190 (Student Behavior), 7:310 (Restrictions on Publications; Elementary Schools)

ADOPTED:           June 27, 2012

6:240 Field Trips and Recreational Class Trips

Field trips are encouraged when the experiences are a part of the school curriculum and/or contribute to the District’s educational objectives.

All field trips must have the Building Principal’s prior approval, except that field trips beyond a 200-mile radius of the school or extending overnight must have the prior approval of the Superintendent or designee.  The Superintendent or designee shall analyze the following factors to determine whether to approve a field trip:  educational value, student safety, parent concerns, heightened security alerts, and liability concerns.  On all field trips, a bus fee set by the Superintendent or designee may be charged to help defray the transportation costs.

Parents/guardians of students:  (1) shall be given the opportunity to consent to their child’s participation in any field trip, and (2) are responsible for all entrance fees, food, lodging, or other costs, except that the District will pay such costs for students who qualify for free or reduced school lunches.  All non-participating students shall be provided an alternative experience.  Any field trip may be cancelled without notice due to an unforeseen event or condition.

Privately arranged trips, including those arranged by District staff members in their individual capacity as private citizens and not in their capacity as District employees, shall not be represented as or construed to be sponsored by the District or school. The District does not provide liability protection for privately arranged trips and is not responsible for any damages arising from them.

Recreational Class Trips

Recreational class trips are permissible provided they do not interfere with the District’s educational goals.  The provisions in this policy concerning field trips are also applicable to recreational class trips, except those regarding educational value.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/29-3.1.

CROSS REF.:          6:10 (Educational Philosophy and Objectives), 7:270 (Administering Medicines to Students)

ADOPTED:           September 3, 2013

6:250 Community Resource Persons and Volunteers

The Board of Education encourages the use of resource persons and volunteers to:  (1) increase students’ educational attainment, (2) provide enrichment experiences for students, (3) increase the effective utilization of staff time and skills, (4) give more individual attention to students, and (5) promote greater community involvement.

Resource persons and volunteers may be used:

  1. For non-teaching duties not requiring instructional judgment or evaluation of students;
  2. For supervising study halls, long distance teaching reception areas used incident to instructional programs transmitted by electronic media (such as computers, video, and audio), detention and discipline areas, and school-sponsored extracurricular activities;
  3. To assist with academic programs under a certificated teacher’s immediate supervision;
  4. As a guest lecturer or resource person under a certificated teacher’s direction and with the administration’s approval; or
  5. As supervisors, chaperones, or sponsors for non-academic school activities.

Any individual who volunteers in any of the District’s schools throughout the school year is required to submit to a finger-print based criminal history records check.  For purposes of this policy, “volunteer” includes, but is not limited to, mentors, parents, grandparents, college students, student teachers, retired teachers and any other individual who provides services in the District’s schools voluntarily three or more times in a school year.  If the volunteer is assigned to more than one school, the number of times worked by the individual shall be calculated cumulatively.

All volunteer coaches must comply with the requirement to report hazing in policy 5:90, Abused and Neglected Child Reporting.

The fingerprint-based criminal history records check shall be performed on each volunteer covered by this policy prior to the individual being allowed to serve as a volunteer in any of the District’s schools.  Authorization for the check shall be furnished by the volunteer. These individuals shall provide a written authorization, which includes name, sex, race, date of birth, social security number, fingerprint images, and other identifiers, which shall be submitted to the Illinois State Police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  The Board President or designee will keep any conviction record confidential and share it only with the Superintendent or designee.  A copy of the record of convictions obtained from the Illinois State Police and the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall be provided to the volunteer.

The District retains the right to refuse the services of any individual who wishes to volunteer with the District whose criminal background investigation reveals a criminal history.

The Superintendent shall further perform a check of the Statewide Sex Offender Database and Violent Offender Against Youth Database (when available) on each volunteer who works in the District’s schools throughout the year.  Also, the Methamphetamine Control and Community Protection Registry is checked.  The Superintendent or designee shall notify a volunteer if the volunteer is identified in either database.

No individual who is a “sex offender,” as defined by the Sex Offender Registration Act, or a “violent offender against youth,” as defined in the Child Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registration Act, may serve as a volunteer in the District.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-22.34, 5/10-22.34a, and 5/10-22.34b.

720 ILCS 5/12C-50.1.

730 ILCS 152/101 et seq. and 154/75-105.

CROSS REF.:          4:170 (Safety), 5:90 (Abused and Neglected Child Reporting), 5:280 (Duties and Qualifications), 8:30 (Visitors to and Conduct on School Property), 8:95 (Parental Involvement)

ADOPTED:           June 17, 2014

  • 6:255 Assemblies and Ceremonies

    Assemblies must be approved by the Superintendent or designee and be consistent with the District’s educational objectives.

    The District shall not endorse or otherwise promote invocations, benedictions, and group prayers at any school assembly, ceremony, or other school-sponsored activity.

    LEGAL REF.:        Lee v. Weisman, 112 S.Ct. 2649 (1992).

    Santa Fe Independent School District v. Doe, 120 S.Ct. 2266 (2000).

    Jones v. Clear Creek Independent School District, 977 F.2d 963 (5th Cir., 1992), reh’g denied, 983 F.2d 234 (5th Cir., 1992) and cert. denied, 113 S.Ct. 2950 (1993).

    CROSS REF.:          6:70 (Teaching About Religion), 6:80 (Teaching About Controversial Issues)

    ADOPTED:           October 18, 2016

6:260 Complaints About Curriculum, Instructional Materials, and Programs

Persons with suggestions or complaints about curriculum, instructional materials, and programs should complete a curriculum objection form and/or use the Uniform Grievance Procedure. A parent/guardian may request that his/her child be exempt from using a particular instructional material or program by completing a curriculum objection form.

CROSS REF.:          2:260 (Uniform Grievance Procedure), 8:110 (Public Suggestions and Complaints)

ADOPTED:           October 18, 2016

6:270 Guidance and Counseling Program

The School District provides a guidance and counseling program for students. The Superintendent or designee shall direct the District’s guidance and counseling program. School counseling services, as described by State law, may be performed by a qualified guidance specialist or any certificated staff member.

Each staff member is responsible for effectively guiding students under his/her supervision in order to provide early identification of intellectual, emotional, social, or physical needs, diagnosis of any learning disabilities, and development of educational potential. The District’s counselors shall offer counseling to those students who require additional assistance.

The guidance program will assist students to identify career options consistent with their abilities, interests, and personal values. Students shall be encouraged to seek the help of counselors to develop specific curriculum goals that conform to the student’s career objectives. High school juniors and seniors will have the opportunity to receive career-oriented information. Representatives from colleges and universities, occupational training institutions and career-oriented recruiters, including the military, may be given access to the school campus in order to provide students and parents/guardians with information.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-22.24a and 5/10-22.24b.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.420(q).

CROSS REF.:          6:50 (School Wellness), 6:65 (Student Social and Emotional Development), 6:110 (Programs for Students At Risk of Academic Failure and/or Dropping Out of School and Graduation Incentives Program), 6:120 (Education of Children with Disabilities), 6:130 (Program for the Gifted), 7:100 (Health, Eye, and Dental Examinations; Immunizations; and Exclusion of Students), 7:250 (Student Support Services), 7:290 (Suicide and Depression Awareness and Prevention)

ADOPTED:           January 19, 2010

6:280 Grading and Promotion

The Superintendent shall establish a system of grading and reporting academic achievement to students and their parents/guardians. The system shall also determine when promotion and graduation requirements are met. The decision to promote a student to the next grade level shall be based on successful completion of the curriculum, attendance, and performance on the Illinois Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) and/or other assessments.  A student shall not be promoted based upon age or any other social reason not related to academic performance.  The administration shall determine remedial assistance for a student who is not promoted.

Every teacher shall maintain an evaluation record for each student in the teacher’s classroom. A District administrator cannot change the final grade assigned by the teacher without notifying the teacher. Reasons for changing a student’s final grade include:

  • A miscalculation of test scores,
  • A technical error in assigning a particular grade or score,
  • The teacher agrees to allow the student to do extra work that may impact the grade,
  • An inappropriate grading system used to determine the grade, or
  • An inappropriate grade based on an appropriate grading system.

Should a grade change be made, the administrator making the change must sign the changed record.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/2-3.64a-5, 5/10-20.9a, 5/10-21.8, and 5/27-27.

CROSS REF.:          6:110 (Programs for Students At Risk of Academic Failure and/or Dropping Out of School and Graduation Incentives Program), 6:300 (Graduation Requirements), 6:340 (Student Testing and Assessment Program), 7:50 (School Admissions and Student Transfers To and From Non-District Schools)

ADOPTED:           May 5, 2015

6:300 Graduation Requirements

Unless otherwise exempted, each student must successfully accomplish the following in order to graduate from high school:

  1. Complete all District graduation requirements that are in addition to the State requirements.
  2. Completing all courses as provided in the School Code, 105 ILCS 5/27-22.
  3. Complete all minimum requirements for graduation as specified by Illinois State Board of Education rule, 23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.440.
  4. Pass an examination on patriotism and principles of representative government, proper use of the flag, methods of voting, and the Pledge of Allegiance.
  5. Participating in State assessments that are required for graduation by the School Code, 105 ILCS 5/2-3.64a-5(c).

The Superintendent or designee is responsible for:

  1. Maintaining a description of all course offerings that comply with the above graduation requirements,
  2. Notifying students and their parents/guardians of graduation requirements,
  3. Developing the criteria for determining when a student accomplishes number 4 above,
  4. Complying with State law requirements for students who transfer during their senior year because their parent(s)/guardian(s) are on active military duty, this includes making reasonable adjustments to ensure graduation if possible, or efforts to ensure that the original (transferor) school district issues the student a diploma, and
  5. Taking all other actions needed or necessary to implement this policy.

Early Graduation

The Superintendent or designee shall implement procedures for students to graduate early, provided they finish 6 semesters of high school and meet all graduation requirements. Juniors who wish to graduate one year early must notify administration within the first five days of the spring semester of the junior year. Seniors who wish to graduate early in January must notify administration within the first five days of fall semester of the senior year.

Certificate of Completion

A student with a disability who has an Individualized Education Program prescribing special education, transition planning, transition services, or related services beyond the student’s 4 years of high school, qualifies for a certificate of completion after the student has completed 4 years of high school. The student is encouraged to participate in the graduation ceremony of his or her high school graduation class. The Superintendent or designee shall provide timely written notice of this requirement to children with disabilities and their parents/guardians.

Veterans of World War II, the Korean Conflict, or the Vietnam Conflict

Upon application, an honorably discharged veteran of World War II, the Korean Conflict, or the Vietnam Conflict will be awarded a diploma, provided that he or she: (1) resided within an area currently within the District at the time he or she left high school, (2) left high school before graduating in order to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces, and (3) has not received a high school diploma.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/2-3.64a-5, 5/22-27, 5/27-3, 5/27-22, 5/27-22.10, and 70/.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.440.

CROSS REF.:          6:30 (Organization of Instruction), 6:310 (High School Credit for Non-District Experiences; Course Substitutions; Re-Entering Students), 6:315 (High School Credit for Students in Grade 7 or 8), 6:320 (High School Credit for Proficiency), 7:50 (School Admissions and Student Transfers To and From Non-District Schools)

ADOPTED:           June 21, 2016

6:310 High School Credit for Non-District Experiences; Course Substitutions; Re-Entering Students

Credit for Non-District Experiences

A student may receive high school credit for successfully completing any of the listed courses or experiences even when it is not offered in or sponsored by the District:

  1. Distance learning course, including a correspondence, virtual, or online course
  2. Courses in an accredited foreign exchange program
  3. Summer school or community college courses
  4. College courses offering dual credit courses at both the college and high school level
  5. Foreign language courses taken in an ethnic school program approved by the Illinois State Board of Education
  6. Work-related training at manufacturing facilities or agencies in a Youth Apprenticeship Vocational Education Program (Tech Prep)
  7. Credit earned in a Vocational Academy

The student must seek approval from the Superintendent or designee to receive graduation credit for any non-District course or experience. The Superintendent or designee shall determine the amount of credit and whether a proficiency examination is required before the credit is awarded. As approval is not guaranteed, students should seek conditional approval of the experience before participating in a non-District course or experience. The student assumes responsibility for any fee, tuition, supply, or other expense. The student seeking credit is responsible for (1) providing documents or transcripts that demonstrate successful completion of the experience, and (2) taking a proficiency examination, if requested. The Superintendent or designee shall determine which, if any, non-District courses or experiences, will count toward a student’s grade point average, class rank, and eligibility for athletic and extracurricular activities. This section does not govern the transfer of credits for students transferring into the District.

Substitutions for Required Courses

Vocational or technical education. A student in grades 9-12 may satisfy one or more high school courses (including physical education) or graduation requirements by successfully completing related vocational or technical education courses if:

  1. The Building Principal approves the substitution and the vocational or technical education course is completely described in curriculum material along with its relationship to the required course; and
  2. The student’s parent/guardian requests and approves the substitution in writing on forms provided by the District.

Advanced placement computer science. The advanced placement computer science course is equivalent to a high school mathematics course. A student in grades 9-12 may substitute the advanced placement computer science course for one year of mathematics, in accordance with Section 27-22 of the School Code. The transcript of a student who completes the advanced placement computer science course will state that it qualifies as a mathematics-based, quantitative course.

Substitutions for physical education. A student in grades 9-12, unless otherwise stated, may submit a written request to the Building Principal to be excused from physical education courses for the reasons stated below. The Superintendent or designee shall maintain records showing that the criteria set forth in this policy were applied to the student’s individual circumstances, as appropriate. 

  1. Enrollment in a marching band program for credit;
  2. Enrollment in Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) program sponsored by the District;
  3. Ongoing participation in an interscholastic athletic program (student must be in the 11th or 12th grade);
  4. Enrollment in academic classes that are required for admission to an institution of higher learning (student must be in the 11th or 12th grade); or
  5. Enrollment in academic classes that are required for graduation from high school, provided that failure to take such classes will result in the student being unable to graduate (student must be in the 11th or 12th grade).

A student who is eligible for special education may be excused from physical education courses pursuant to 7:260, Exemption from Physical Education. Volunteer service credit. A student participating in the District’s Volunteer Service Credit Program, if any, may earn credit toward graduation for the performance of community service. The amount of credit given for program participation shall not exceed that given for completion of one semester of language arts, math, science, or social studies.

Re-Entering Students

Individuals younger than 21 years of age may re-enter high school to acquire a high school diploma or an equivalency certificate, subject to the limitations in Board policy 7:50, School Admissions and Student Transfers To and From Non-District Schools. Re-entering students may obtain credit through the successful completion of the following (not all of these may be available at any one time):

  1. District courses
  2. Non-District experiences described in this policy
  3. Classes in a program established under Section 10-22.20 of the School Code, in accordance with the standards established by the Illinois Community College Board
  4. Proficiency testing, correspondence courses, life experiences, and other nonformal educational endeavors
  5. Military service, provided the individual making the request has a recommendation from the U.S. Commission of Accreditation of Service Experiences

The provisions in the section Credit for Non-District Experiences, above, apply to the receipt of credit for any non-District course.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/2-3.44, 5/2-3.108, 5/2-3.115, 5/2-3.142, 5/10-22.43a, 5/27-6, 5/27-22.3, and 5/27-22.05.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §§1.425(e) and (f), 1.440(f), and 1.470(c).

CROSS REF.:          6:180 (Extended Instructional Programs), 6:300 (Graduation Requirements), 6:315 (High School Credit for Students in Grade 7 or 8), 6:320 (High School Credit for Proficiency), 7:50 (School Admissions and Student Transfers To and From Non-District Schools), 7:260 (Exemption from Physical Education)

ADOPTED:           February 21, 2017

6:315 High School Credit for Students in Grade 7 or 8

The Superintendent or designee may investigate, coordinate, and implement a program for students in grades 7 and 8 to enroll in a course required for a high school diploma.

If a program is available, students in grades 7 and 8 may enroll in a course required for a high school diploma when the course is offered by the high school that the elementary student would attend and either of the following is satisfied: (1) the student participates in the course at the high school and the elementary student’s enrollment in the course would not prevent a high school student from being able to enroll, or (2) the student participates in the course where the student attends school as long as the course is taught by a teacher who holds a professional educator license with an endorsement for the grade level and content area of the course.

A student who successfully completes a course required for a high school diploma while in grades 7 and 8 shall receive academic credit for the course. That academic credit shall satisfy the requirements of Section 27-22 of the School Code for purposes of receiving a high school diploma, unless evidence about the course’s rigor and content show that the course did not address the relevant Illinois learning standard at the level appropriate for the high school grade during which the course is usually taken. The student’s grade in the course shall also be included in the student’s grade point average.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-22.43 and 5/27-22.10.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.460.

CROSS REF.:          6:300 (Graduation Requirements), 6:310 (High School Credit for Non-District Experiences; Course Substitutions; Re-Entering Students), 6:320 (High School Credit for Proficiency)

ADOPTED:           January 19, 2016

6:320 High School Credit for Proficiency

Proficiency Credits

Subject to the limitations in this policy and State law, the Superintendent or designee is authorized to establish and approve a program for granting credit for proficiency with the goal of allowing a student who would not benefit from a course because the student is proficient in the subject area to receive credit without having to take the course. A student who demonstrates competency under this program will receive course credit for the applicable course and be excused from any requirement to take the course as a graduation prerequisite. No letter grade will be given for purposes of the student’s cumulative grade point average. The Superintendent or designee shall notify students of the availability of and requirements for receiving proficiency credit.

Proficiency credit will be offered in the following subject areas:

Foreign language – A student is eligible to receive one year of foreign language credit if the student has graduated from an accredited elementary school and can demonstrate proficiency, according to this District’s academic criteria, in a language other than English. A student who demonstrates proficiency in American Sign Language is deemed proficient in a foreign language and will receive one year of foreign language credit. A student who studied a foreign language in an approved ethnic school program is eligible to receive appropriate credit according to the level of proficiency reached; the student may be required to take a proficiency examination.

Other proficiency testing – The program for granting credit for proficiency may allow, as the Superintendent deems appropriate, course credit to be awarded on the basis of a local examination to a student who has achieved the necessary proficiency through independent study or work taken in or through another institution. Proficiency testing may also be used to determine eligible credit for other subjects whenever students enter from non-graded schools, non-recognized or non-accredited schools, or were in a home-schooling program.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-22.43, 5/10-22.43a, 5/27-22, and 5/27-24.3.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §1.460.

CROSS REF.:          6:300 (Graduation Requirements), 6:310 (High School Credit for Non-District Experiences; Course Substitutions; Re-Entering Students), 6:315 (High School Credit for Students in Grade 7 or 8)

ADOPTED:           January 19, 2016

6:330 Achievement and Awards

Grade Point Average and Class Honor Roll

The Superintendent or designee shall maintain a uniform process for secondary schools to calculate, on at least a yearly basis, each student’s grade point average and the honor roll for each class.

Awards and Honors

The Superintendent or designee shall maintain a uniform process for presenting awards and honors for outstanding scholarship, achievement, and/or distinguished service in school activities in such a way as to minimize bias and promote fairness. The Superintendent or designee shall supervise the selection of the recipient(s).

All donations for awards, honors, and scholarships receive the Board of Education’s approval.

ADOPTED: January 19, 2010

Rev. 02/10

6:340 Student Testing and Assessment Program

The District student assessment program provides information for determining individual student achievement and instructional needs; curriculum and instruction effectiveness; and school performance measured against District student learning objectives and statewide norms.

The Superintendent or designee shall manage the student assessment program that, at a minimum:

  1. Administers the State assessment system, known as the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC), to all students and/or any other appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including norm and criterion-referenced achievement tests, aptitude tests, proficiency tests, and teacher-developed tests.
  2. Informs students of the timelines and procedures applicable to their participation in every State assessment.
  3. Provides each student’s parents/guardians with the results or scores of each State assessment. See policy 6:280, Grading and Promotion.
  4. Utilizes professional testing practices.

Overall student assessment data on tests required by State law will be aggregated by the District and reported, along with other information, on the District’s annual report card. All reliable assessments administered by the District and scored by entities outside of the District must be (1) reported to ISBE on its form by the 30th day of each school year, and (2) made publicly available to parents and guardians of students. Board policy 7:340, Student Records, and its implementing procedures govern recordkeeping and access issues.

LEGAL REF.:        Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 20 U.S.C. §1232g.

105 ILCS 5/2-3.63a-5, 5/2-3.64a-5, 5/10-17a, 5/22-82, and 5/27-1.

CROSS REF.:          6:15 (School Accountability), 6:280 (Grading and Promotion), 7:340 (Student Records)

ADOPTED:           February 21, 2017

Remote Educational Program

The Superintendent may develop, maintain, and supervise a remote educational program consistent with Section 10-29 of the School Code. The remote educational program shall provide an opportunity for qualifying students to participate in an educational program delivered by the District in a location outside of a school.

The remote educational program shall:

1.      Align its curriculum with the Illinois State Learning Standards and Board policies 6:10, Educational Philosophy and Objectives and 6:15, School Accountability.

2.      Offer instruction and educational experiences consistent with those given to students at the same grade level in the District through compliance with Board policies 6:30, Organization of Instruction and 6:300, Graduation Requirements.

3.      Provide instructors that meet the teacher qualifications in Board policy 5:190, Teacher Qualifications. Instructors are responsible for the following elements of the program:

a.       Planning instruction,

b.      Diagnosing learning needs,

c.       Prescribing content delivery through class activities,

d.      Assessing learning,

e.       Reporting outcomes to administrators and parents/guardians, and

f.       Evaluating the effects of instruction.

4.       Provide a remote educational program anytime during the period of time from and including the opening date to the closing date of the District’s regular school term. It may operate on any calendar day, notwithstanding whether it is a student attendance day or institute day on the School District’s calendar or any other provision of law restricting instruction on that day. The District’s regular school term is established by Board policies 2:20, Powers and Duties of the School Board and 6:20, School Year Calendar and Day.  The remote educational program may be offered outside of the regular school term as part of any authorized summer school program.

5.      Calculate the number of clock hours a student participates in instruction in alignment with Board policy 6:20, School Year Calendar and Day.

6.      Limit participation to students who are juniors or seniors or demonstrate individual educational need(s). Approval of students in the program will be on a space-available basis.

7.      Authorize the Superintendent or designee to approve students for participation in the program when the student shows evidence of:

a.       Enrollment in the District pursuant to Board policies 7:60, Residence and 7:30, Student Assignment and Intra-District Transfer.

b.      Prior approval from their individualized educational program (IEP) team, if applicable.

c.       How the remote educational program best serves the student’s individual learning needs.

d.      A consistent, appropriate attendance record, no disciplinary record, and a 2.5 minimum grade point average.

8.      Include a process for developing and approving a written remote educational plan for each student participating in the program.

9.      Require students to complete their participation in the program within 12 months, unless the student’s participation is extended by the District.

10.  Require students to participate in all assessments administered by the District pursuant to State and federal law and Board policy 6:340, Student Testing and Assessment Program.

11.  Align with the requirements of Board policy 7:340, Student Records.

12.  Comply with other State and federal laws and align with all applicable Board policies. This includes the Superintendent submitting a copy of this policy to the Illinois State Board of Education along with any amendments to it and any data on student participation.

13.  Be monitored by the Board pursuant to Board policy 2:240, Board Policy Development and included as an topic for discussion in the annual report required by Board policy 6:10, Educational Philosophy and Objectives. It shall include a discussion of the process for renewal of the program when applicable.

LEGAL REF.:        105 ILCS 5/10-29.

23 Ill.Admin.Code §226.360.

CROSS REF.:         2:20 (Powers and Duties of the Board of Education), 2:240 (Board Policy Development), 5:190 (Teacher Qualifications), 6:10 (Educational Philosophy and Objectives) 6:15 (School Accountability), 6:20 (School Year Calendar and Day), 6:30 (Organization of Instruction), 6:300 (Graduation Requirements), 6:340 (Student Testing and Assessment Program), 7:30 (Student Assignment and Intra-District Transfer), 7:60 (Residence), 7:340 (Student Records)

ADOPTED:            June 5, 2012